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The Wilsden Poppy Project

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The Wilsden Poppy Project

Poppies LondonIn August 2014, the art installation ‘Blood swept lands and seas of red’ saw 888,246 ceramic poppies placed in the Tower of London’s dry moat, one for each British ad Colonial fatality during the First World War.

Now, with the centenary of the Battle of the Somme approaching, Wilsden Trinity Church  is making its own tribute to the soldiers of Bradford who were caught up in the events of the first day of the battle, 1st July 1916.

It is estimated that around 2,000 Bradford men went over the top on that day and by the end of the first hour 1,770 of them had either been killed or injured.  The ‘Pals’ battalions were particularly badly hit.

The Pals battalions were specially constituted battalions of the British Army comprising men who had enlisted together in local recruiting drives, with the promise that they would e able to serve alongside their friends, neighbours and colleagues (pals)  rather than being arbitrarily allocated to battalions.  The result on 1st July was that a huge number of young men in the Bradford Pals (and also the Leeds Pals) fought and fell together.

Poppies CrochetedAt Trinity, we hope to create our own sea of red by placing 1,770 knitted or crocheted poppies on stems in the churchyard on Friday 1st July 2016 and over the Saturday and Sunday of the same weekend.

To do this we need the help of willing crafters, anyone who can wield a knitting needle or crochet hook, to make such a large number of poppies.

We are borrowing the patterns (two knitted and two crocheted) from BBC Radio Nottingham’s Big Poppy Knit and they can be found on this WEBSITE.

The poppies will be for sale once the weekend is over, for a minimum donation of £2 eacn, the oney will be given to the British Legion.  You can phone 07986 294757 for more information.

By | 2017-11-30T14:26:46+01:00 April 10th, 2016|Baildon news, Local|0 Comments

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